by Peter Zimmerman Catherine Ingraham’s essay that accompanies the 1999 Sherrie Levine / Joost van Oss collaborative exhibition at the Paula Cooper Gallery in New York City highlights three major facets of their collaborative works of appropriation. However, instead of being merely commentaries on the originals by Gerrit Rietveld, Levine and Oss re-write, and thereby […]

Barbara Kruger’s Words of Prey

November 24, 2008 | Comments Off on Barbara Kruger’s Words of Prey

by Peter Zimmerman Art does not exist and is not created in a vacuum; rather, it is constantly in negotiation with ideological shifts, cultural re-mappings, and historical motions. Rosalind Krauss, in her essay (humorously) titled “Cindy Sherman: Untitled” describes the two purported Universal Truths of the artist, as proposed by Emile Zola: that X is […]

Response #3: Here. In Her Head: Cindy’s Disasters

November 12, 2008 | Comments Off on Response #3: Here. In Her Head: Cindy’s Disasters

-Joan Bowlen Perhaps a reframing of my definition would be helpful in this discussion of Cindy and the portrait.  Beginning last time as I did with such a limiting definition restricted the universal sense of the portrait which I want to engender.  Though the media for which the term “portrait” is most often applied exhibit […]

Response #2: “Disasters” as The Breaking Point

November 9, 2008 | Comments Off on Response #2: “Disasters” as The Breaking Point

– Peter Zimmerman You write, “I see the portrait as the framing of the human face within a 2-D plane, using the artist’s own emotive reading of the face in order to create a sense of the sitter.” I feel this coding of the portrait verges on the archaic, thereby not allowing for more plastic […]

Response

November 4, 2008 | Comments Off on Response

— Joan Bowlen I think the ability to read these images as portraits stems from a more wide spread idea of the role that the portrait plays. I see the portrait as the framing of the human face within a 2-D plane, using the artist’s own emotive reading of the face in order to create […]

– Peter Zimmerman While I can see the placement of identity as forefront and vital to the dialogue not only about Cindy Sherman but also that of portraiture in general, is there, potentially, something more that allows for the “Fairy Tales / Disasters” photographs to be seen as outside of the history of portraiture? I […]