Some art-related links for Tuesday:

  • Blake Gopnik, “Retail Imitates Art. Is This A Sincere Form Of Flattery?” (Washington Post) This column looks at the ways in which a advertising agency Newmark Knight Frank in NYC appropriated the visual code of Barbara Kruger to help sell retail space via advertisement. Gopnik raises the issue of ownership of artistic style and muses on whether the advertisement is successful because it’s catchy, or because we recognize it as “art” and thus feel compelled to give it our attention. Barbara Kruger and her work of the late 1970s/early 1980s will be  profiled in this blog later in October. 
  • Christopher Knight, “Belgian artist Alÿs reinvents a saint at LACMA” (LA Times) Art columnist Christopher Knight offers a review of the “Francis Alÿs: Fabiola” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Knight looks at the ways in which Alÿs plays with reproduction to open dialogues of identity, representation, and the technological processes of modern day artistic traditions. Important to note– Knight makes a direct comparison of Alÿs’ works with that of Cindy Sherman. 
  • Ben Street, “Letter From London: Hirst Among Equals” (PBS: art21) Street provides a look into the recent Sotheby’s auction on September 15, 2008 of a couple hundred Damien Hirst works. This auction has radically changed the ways galleries and artists may approach the art market in efforts to sell art… and potentially not in a good way.

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